Recent Comments and Answered Questions on Green Building Advisor

  • | Jan 19,2018 09:28 PM EST
    Richard, That's really interesting equipment but I already have ducting so I'm guessing it isn't a good option to run different ducting. But thanks for sharing the link.
  • | Jan 19,2018 09:17 PM EST
    Reply to Martin Rates: Electricity Winter: ~$0.10/kwh. Summer: ~$0.10/kwh similar tier 1 pricing. i'm not sure about tier 2 pricing as I don't currently hit it. Gas: This past year, ...
  • | Jan 19,2018 08:31 PM EST
    As long as the main ceilIng is drywalled, or fireblocked, that seperates floor or attic space you can have open wall sides above suspended. Silmilar to a kitchen soffit, you can frame a soffit but ...
  • Malcolm Taylor | Jan 19,2018 08:30 PM EST
    Living on the West Coast during the 1980s I was exposed to every imaginable form of purifying filters and burnt offerings. I think I've almost recovered.
  • Kevin Lucas | Jan 19,2018 07:45 PM EST
    I really appreciate the comments so far. I would rather utilize the wall units. Does it appear to be a way to make it work and still be efficient?
  • J M | Jan 19,2018 06:15 PM EST
    A19 is the most common bulb but Warm Glow dimming is available in various common bases and shapes and up to 1600 lumen (100W).
  • | Jan 19,2018 06:11 PM EST
    Yes there is an air gap, flashing and weep holes. Dana which big box store should you recommend for EPS? Also it’s a 1967 Construction so there is probably nothing under the slab but I have ...
  • J M | Jan 19,2018 06:09 PM EST
    Dana Philips makes dimming LED bulbs that shift to lower color temperature that have been available for a few years now at big box stores. They start at 2700K and dim down to around 2200K. ...
  • Dana Dorsett | Jan 19,2018 05:56 PM EST
    An EPDM sill gasket to provide a capillary break between the concrete & wood is a worthwhile detail to add. Using polyisocyanurate or EPS instead of XPS is substantally greener, due to the much ...
  • Martin Holladay | Jan 19,2018 05:38 PM EST
    Tkaj and Armando, I assumed that there is an air gap between the brick veneer and the housewrap, as well as the usual through-brick flashing and weep holes at the base of the brick veneer -- even ...
  • Armando Cobo | Jan 19,2018 05:27 PM EST
    FYI - you should have a brickledge for your brick veneer on the outside of the concrete wall, otherwise, rainwater has a good chance of getting inside under the framed wall.
  • Alan B | Jan 19,2018 05:00 PM EST
    Point taken, i should have mentioned i was referring to the most common bulbs, the 40W/60W/100W E26 base bulb
  • Dana Dorsett | Jan 19,2018 04:25 PM EST
    Cellulose only wins the low embodied energy contest if discounting the manufacturing energy of the paper due to it's being made from recycled or surplus stock. The embodied energy of paper ...
  • Dana Dorsett | Jan 19,2018 03:56 PM EST
    Incandesents with clear or frosted glass hit CRI 100 (but at quite a range of color temperatures- a 100 watt halogen is a lot bluer than a 40 watt cheapie, with a much higher color temperature.) ...
  • Martin Holladay | Jan 19,2018 03:54 PM EST
    Mike, As you probably know, when it comes to embodied energy, cellulose wins the contest. For more on embodied energy, see All About Embodied Energy.
  • Martin Holladay | Jan 19,2018 03:52 PM EST
    Tkaj, The wall above the concrete wall does not need rigid foam in the middle of the wall. If you are using fiberglass batts, just insulate with batts. You don't want any air spaces. The ...
  • Nathan Spriegel | Jan 19,2018 03:36 PM EST
    Kye, would you happen to have a reputable source for such claims. Mercola . . . is not. Anti-vaccine, anti-GMO, constantly wrong on science facts and very biased. "Alternative" medicine at it's worst.
  • Andy Chappell-Dick | Jan 19,2018 01:55 PM EST
    Mike, you want your structure "to last generations with little to no maintenance", which means that your selection of insulation material is not nearly as important as the design and execution of ...
  • Martin Holladay | Jan 19,2018 01:38 PM EST
    Mike, Cellulose has been installed in attics for over 40 years, and I've never heard of cellulose wearing out. Old cellulose is still there. I've seen a lot of old fiberglass, and it looks ...
  • Andrew Bater | Jan 19,2018 01:29 PM EST
    I agree it makes sense to exercise caution when hanging laundry inside. Certainly you do not want moisture to condense inside your walls. In my case, because of the drying that our heat ...
Register for a free account and join the conversation


Get a free account and join the conversation!
Become a GBA PRO!